63
19 May 12 at 11 am

moncoeurfaitboom:

Don’t Leave Me (Ne me quitte pas), Regina Spektor
What We Saw From The Cheap Seats

(via moncoeurfaitboom-deactivated201)

 14
19 Apr 12 at 5 pm

Langston Hughes

"Hold fast to dreams
For if dreams die
Life is a broken-winged bird
That cannot fly.
Hold fast to dreams
For when dreams go
Life is a barren field
Frozen with snow."

 1870
02 Apr 12 at 5 pm

Sara June Parker (via julie911)

(via kari-shma)

"May I never miss a sunset or a rainbow because I am looking down."

 11269
30 Mar 12 at 12 pm

theatlantic:

6 Writing Tips From John Steinbeck

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.

2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.

3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.

4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.

5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.

6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

Read more. [Image: AP]

(via memoirs-of-an-amelia)

theatlantic:

6 Writing Tips From John Steinbeck

1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
Read more. [Image: AP]
 2
30 Mar 12 at 1 am

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides (via dsscott)

"The streets were still full of trees, bare in winter, so that we could see all the way to the frozen river. I was thinking how amazing it was that the world contained so many lives. Out in these streets people were embroiled in a thousand matters, money problems, love problems, school problems. People were falling in love, getting married, going to drug rehab, learning how to ice-skate, getting bifocals, studying for exams, trying on clothes, getting their hair cut, and getting born. And in some houses people were getting old and sick and were dying, leaving others to grieve. It was happening all the time, unnoticed, and it was the thing that really mattered."

Dear Diary:

It’s only 8:22 on a Friday night and I’m up wide awake making pancakes, listening to the same lewd song blaring over and over and I still hear Matt snoring like a pig through my earphones and he’s all the way in the room I swear, whenever everyone’s asleep and I hear someone snoring I get sad as hell it really makes you feel so lonesome. It’s the most terrible sound when you’re alone. I haven’t made pancakes in what feels like years the last time I truly remember making them I was eight years old. I could make them perfectly. The batter was always so soft and milky white and it would make pillowy sounds as I fluffed it up in that favorite bowl my God it was always the most beautiful thing as I poured it into the frying pan and and it would slowly spread out into this perfect circle and it was just perfect!! I know how to flip it over at the right precise time you just gotta count the number of holes and when you   did you would get this amazing shade of brown it is just perfection I tell you, and HOLY SHIT MY PANCAKES    ahh fuck there goes my latent skill of pancake mastery because my pancakes are ugly runny splotches and the frying pan is hissing at me in protest I think, and there I flipped this  weird damn lump over and it is just a burnt shade of brown on one side and white on the other with this black ring surrounding it so it kinda looks like this ying yang circle. I sorta imagen what it would be like if there was a graven image of Jesus instead, looking up at me with a discerning eye I hope. 

You know what, Diary, I’ve been mulling over this for a while now, but as I was watching those pancakes burn to a fucking crisp, I wished for my innocence back. I must have lost it long ago, who knows, but at that moment I really felt like I had let go of it the minute I smashed that egg against the dirty kitchen counter. And I can’t ever piece it together and get it back, huh? Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall I can never be that little kid making pancakes for her mother again. I looked down at my pancakes and started praying all of a sudden I said Jesus Christ, if you’re there, please PLEASE let me have my fucking innocence back. PLEASE. I mean I never do anything batshit crazy I’m a good girl I like to stay in bed and read (I’ve never been kissed even) but my point as a STRAIGHT A STUDENT is God knows and I know I lost it. I have a messed up dirty polluted little mind just like everyone else but

There’s so much to express right now, but I think I’ll just sit here for a while and GREAT THE SYRUP IS EIGHT MONTHS PAST ITS DATE I think I am going to be sick later on because I must have eaten half of it and the goop is coating my tongue and making your pages sticky. Now I have to dump the rest because I poured that crap all over the place. Jesus, what a mess.  

Well I have given you a lot of thought and that was a terrible waste of time. I thought about walking down to the IHOP just on the other side of the street, because I still haven’t satisfied my craving, but I really don’t feel like it. What a shit night.

 1
12 Mar 12 at 6 pm

Marina And The Diamonds - Primadonna

 1
10 Mar 12 at 7 pm

For a History class project.

References are here: 

12 3 4 5

For a History class project.
References are here: 
12 3 4 5
 13762
09 Mar 12 at 5 pm

(Source: emmyvemmy, via idrials)


09 Mar 12 at 4 pm

Asked by Anonymous

asker List some of your all time fave books? x

Whoa, hey! I tend to like authors and what they write about. Right now the one guy I can name off the top of my head is Richard Yates. I love his work. A more recent one would be Jeannette Walls. I admire Vonnegut, Dahl, Salinger, Steinbeck, Gladwell, John Green and I’m starting to enjoy quirky Eugenide too. Right now I’m rereading the Hound of the Baskervilles :)

 266779
05 Mar 12 at 5 pm

notxam:

azizwoo:

Reflections Portraits by Tom Hussey 

Tom Hussey portrays old people looking at their younger reflection in the mirror. These photographs are beautiful and melancholic.

(via bagendunderhill)